Boxwood

Do you like a green hedge for 365 days? Then the Buxus Sempervirens (the meaning of sempervirens is - you may have guessed it - 'always green') is the hedge plant for you and your garden. It is an easy plant that is fine to prune in shape and can withstand shade. The boxwood has a difficult time because of the boxwood caterpillar and boxwood moth, but nevertheless remains very popular. And for good reason. The plant is and will remain very stylish.

Visibility blocking
N/A

Deadheading
Once a year

Low maintenance
Average low maintenance

Winter hardness
Very winter hardy

Growth rate
10-20cm a year

Exposure
Shade, partial shade, sun

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 20/30cm

20/30cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 20/30cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
20/30cm

From 6.00
From 6.00

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 30/40cm

30/40cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 30/40cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
30/40cm

From 6.70
From 6.70
  • Customers rate us with a 9/10
  • Free advice/calendar for planting and care
  • Choose your own week of delivery

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 40/50cm

40/50cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 40/50cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
40/50cm

From 9.85
From 9.85

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 50/60cm

50/60cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 50/60cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
50/60cm

From 11.45
From 11.45
  • Choose your own week of delivery
  • Customers rate us with a 9/10
  • Free advice/calendar for planting and care

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 60/80cm

60/80cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 60/80cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
60/80cm

From 15.45
From 15.45

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 80/100cm

80/100cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 80/100cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
80/100cm

From 25.35
From 25.35
  • Free advice/calendar for planting and care
  • Choose your own week of delivery
  • Customers rate us with a 9/10

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 100/125cm

100/125cm

Boxwood / Box Hedge Buxus Sempervirens 100/125cm

  • Available from 31 January 2022

Size excluding root ball
100/125cm

From 31.05
From 31.05

Boxwood

The boxwood is inseparable from the beautiful, green and stylish gardens at palaces and castles. But it is certainly also very beautiful in the garden at your home or business premises. You can make tight hedges with it. The boxwood is a symbol of reliability and class. It is not surprising that many companies choose a box hedge. You too?

Although the Buxus Sempervirens originates from more southern countries, it also does well in our climate. It is still very popular. Despite its not so fast growth, you will quickly have a nice, low hedge. A true enrichment for your garden.

Why choose a boxwood hedge?

  • The boxwood (boxwood) remains green all year round.
  • This hedge plant is hardy.
  • The plant grows quite slowly.
  • It is easy and good to trim.
  • You can use it to create beautiful, sleek hedges.
  • It can withstand shade.
  • A boxwood in a pot is also very beautiful. Next to the front door or in the backyard.
  • The hedge plant radiates class.
  • The Buxus Sempervirens always remains in fashion.
  • You don't have to dig deep into your pocket.

When is the best time to plant a boxwood hedge?

The best months to plant boxwood are October to the end of April. Then the plant is well rooted for the summer.

How do you plant a boxwood hedge?

  1. It may make sense, but clear the surrounding soil completely of weeds.
  2. Dig a straight trench about 1.5 times as deep and wide as the clods of the boxwood plants. Tip: stretch a rope between two sticks before digging.
  3. Loosen the soil well.
  4. Sprinkle some lime into the trench and mix it through the substrate.
  5. Then sprinkle some compost with a lot of leaf soil in the trench.
  6. Repeat point 3.
  7. First place the hedge plants along the trench exactly where you want to plant them. Are you satisfied with the distribution? Then place the boxwood plants in the trench. In the center and upright.
  8. Make sure the top of the root ball is leveled with the ground level. It is possible that the ground is still subsiding slightly. Keep that in mind.
  9. Fill the trench with soil. Press it down well.
  10.  Water generously. Continue to do this for the next few days so that the plants take root.

Tips

Provide enough water, but not too much either. The boxwood does not like wet feet.

When the plants are well rooted, fertilize the hedge with chicken manure or cow manure pellets. This is best done at the end of February, in May after pruning or in July.

Placement

Only in freezing weather you cannot plant a boxwood. The rest of the year you can. Although the plant actually thrives everywhere, it prefers full sun or partial shade.

On average, you need seven plants of approximately 15 to 30 centimeters per linear meter. This will give you a nice, dense hedge.

Advice & Care

  • Give the boxwood enough water; but not too much. Wet feet is not ideal.
  • Do not prune the hedge plant when the weather is sunny, as the twigs will dry out.
  • If you want to keep the hedge or solitary plant in a certain shape, we recommend that you use the pruning shears twice a year. Preferably in the spring.
  • A few weeks after planting the boxwood plants, it is important that you prune the hedge to the desired shape. This will prevent it from becoming more difficult to apply the shape you would like at a later date.
  • Have you pruned a little too vigorously? It happens to the best. Then there is nothing wrong. However, it may take a while before the hedge is nicely full and closed again.
  • When pruning, make sure to keep the pruning shears parallel to the hedge.
  • Keep a close eye on the plant so that you quickly spot any fungi or the boxwood caterpillar.
  • Give the hedge some extra nutrition in due course: chicken manure or cow manure pellets.

Treating known boxwood diseases

Boxwood fungus - the boxwood unfortunately sometimes suffers from the boxwood fungus. The plant will then have yellow or brown leaves that even become completely pale. They fall out more and more over time, leaving you with a bare plant. Inspect the boxwood regularly. If there are black / brown spots on the leaves or black stripes, then it is not good. If you notice this on one or more branches, remove them. Then also clean your tools, gloves and clothing. Prevention is better than cure. However, this fungus is very difficult to prevent. What would help: make sure that the plants are in organic boxwood soil and give them enough boxwood food.

Boxwood caterpillar (boxwood moth) - you will see the following on your boxwood hedge or plant:

  • they spin communal tents and thus leaves that are stuck together;
  • dead leaves;
  • bare branches;
  • the "skeleton" of the boxwood,

then it has fallen prey to the boxwood caterpillar or boxwood moth. Unfortunately, this is common. Are the plants still alive (and is the bark still green)? Then there is still hope and you do not have to write off the plants. You can control the caterpillar in an environmentally friendly way. With products based on, for example, Bacillus Thuriengiensis or Spinosad. You must be thorough and repeat the treatment after a week.

If there is no stopping it and the plants have to be removed, you can think of a Buxus substitute. For example the Japanese holly Dark Green. This is almost indistinguishable from the boxwood. The sisters or brothers of the Ilex Crenata Dark Green are also suitable as an alternative: Ilex Crenata Convexa, Ilex Crenata Green Hedge, Ilex Crenata Blondie, Ilex Crenata Caroline Upright and Ilex Maximowicziana Kanehirae

Advantages and disadvantages of the boxwood

Advantages:

  • he plant is relatively cheap.
  • The boxwood is very suitable for creating low hedges.
  • Its slow growth makes it easy to prune.
  • It retains its shape and is hardy.
  • The Buxus Sempervirens remains green in winter.
  • The plant has a dense structure and is therefore easy to prune into shape.
  • It grows almost on all pitches. Also in the shade.

Disadvantages:

  • It grows slowly.
  • The plant is not suitable for high hedges.
  • Unfortunately, the boxwood is sensitive to boxwood fungus and boxwood moth.
  • Pruned too thoroughly? Then it takes a while before the hedge is nicely closed again.

Conclusion

Are you looking for an affordable hedge plant or pot plant that is green for 365 days and hardy? Then the boxwood is a great choice. Do you have any questions or would you like to order these plants? Please do not hesitate to contact us.